Oil Search inspires employees to drive change through ‘Champions of Change’ initiative
26 March 2018,
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Photo: Oil Search Managing Director Peter Botten addressing employees at the launch of the “Champions of Change” initiative.

Oil Search is aiming to create positive changes around the country through an innovative program that encourages its employees to use the skills and knowledge gained at work to improve their homes and communities.

The initiative, called “Champions of Change”, was launched on March 21 by Oil Search Managing Director, Peter Botten.

Developed and driven by the Oil Search Foundation (OSF), the program targets the areas of women’s empowerment and protection, health and safety, water supply and sanitation and leadership.

Oil Search staff are encouraged to use the tools and knowledge they gain at work to implement community based activities and inspire others.

Mr Botten said the program is a new and exciting approach to support employees to engage with their own communities and inspire others to action in a way that creates a ripple effect across PNG.

“The current efforts around the earthquake

relief are a testament to this. Staff are mobilising in a range of ways both within the business as well as in their homes, churches, sporting groups, communities to help impacted communities,” Mr Botten said.

“It is this sort of commitment to the people of Papua New Guinea that inspires me to get out of bed each day and do what I can to make a difference.

“I know our staff feel the same way. This sort of thing goes to the heart of this company’s culture.”

Oil Search staff will have access to information, training, toolkits and small grant funding to carry out activities in their own communities as champions of change.

The company will track their efforts and stories to share widely and inspire others.

One such story is that of Rage Arnie, who used his basic first aid training learned at work to resuscitate his own son after a near drowning incident.

“We are very lucky at Oil Search to have the opportunity to attend a wide range of

training every day and you never know when you are going to apply this knowledge. For me it was saving my son’s life,” Rage said.

Mr Botten told staff to get involved in whatever way they can.

“Every day we are all engaged in knowledge transfer and quite a lot of that can actually make a difference in homes and communities,” Mr Botten said.

“This includes things like basic first aid training, safety tools and hazard identification.”

“It also includes health promotion information such as our commitment to hand washing and sanitation, malaria control and awareness and increasing HIV and family violence knowledge.”

“Now more than ever we are at a critical juncture in development in Papua New Guinea and what we take home to share within communities can make a real impact,” Mr Botten said.

 

 

 

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